Opening and closing at the Museo de Arte 

There are two worthwhile events this week at the Museo de Arte. Opening on Thursday the 15th at 7pm is Herbadores para Soñadores. This installation in the newly transformed exposition space at the museum is by  Gabriela Zubillaga and curated by Victoria Vinamaragui. 

The following evening. Carla Rippey is giving a talk at the closing of her wonderful retrospective. Entitled Gráfica Reinventada it is also scheduled for 7pm.

I should also mention there are a number of workshops also scheduled this week at the museum. – david sokolec 

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Carla Rippey- Resguardia y Resistencia

I am really looking forward to the opening of Carla Rippey’s retrospective  at the Museo de Arte here in Juarez this Friday night. Rippey is the current director of “La Esmeralda”(La Escuela Nacional de Pintura,Escultura y Grabado) and the first woman to hold that position. Although born in Kansas City, she has lived in Mexico since 1973, having fled Chile after the fall of Salvador Allende.
The exposition, covering the years 1976-2016, recently opened at the Museo de Arte Carillo Gil and from all I can gather  it seems a magnificent show which not only demonstrates her extraordinary skill at interweaving photography and printmaking among other artistic talents, but also, and more importantly, shows her interest in preserving her personal memory, exploring the female and cultural cross-currents.
Should be an incredible show ,particularly for those interested in print making and drawing  but also anyone interested in seeing the workl of this important and involved artist.
The opening is set for Friday 17th at 7 pm.
I also want to mention there is still time to see the show Encuentro de Mujeres Artistas at Alianza Francesa. Thirteen local artists combined forces to show 30 pieces in various media. The work shows just some of the remarkable talent here in Juarez, and the wide range of subject matter and media used. It includes a video, and a wonderful installation in a nook just inside the entry which combines music with shell forms hanging from the ceiling into each one of which is delicately inserted a drawing.
The show continues through April 10. -david sokolec

 

 

 

Venas de Acero

Venas de Acero (Veins of Steel) is not the latest Marvel comic book offer, but the satisfying exhibition of sculptures by Agueda Lozano at the Museo de Arte de Ciudad Juarez. Born in Ciudad Cuauhtemoc, Chihuahua in 1944, Lozano studied art in Nuevo Leon and  moved to Mexico City in the tumultuous year of 1968. There she exhibited widely, but although there were a number of important art movements going on at the time, she apparently didn’t quite feel at home with any of them and moved to France in 1971. That seems to have been a smart move. The Museum of Modern Art  of Paris acquired one of her works  and she won a prize at the International Festival of Cagnes-sur-Mer.
She has spent her time since then working steadily and intensely on her work. She began painting abstracts but then turned to sculpture using steel as her preferred medium while continuing with her works on canvas.fotor_147534070947444.jpg

Ecoute Celeste -200x50x86 cm

The pieces shown here, all of fairly recent vintage and ranging in size from table top to well over 6 feet (200 cm)  show balance, harmony and movement. Lozano often gives her pieces sharp serrated edges as though the halves had been ripped apart. Other works are like “La Derniere Page” which shows leaves of a book with  the last page appearing to have just been turned.fotor_147525045699786.jpg La Derniere Page (132x75x85cm)

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Terre du Mexique Enterre de France (116x35x26cm)

There is a fluidity and sense of movement in many of the works with the parts seeming to either be about to wrap around each other or perhaps fly off.

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Etoile Filante (200×200 cm)
Also on exhibit are  some of her large (200 x 200cm) abstract paintings. These are spare uncluttered works which  hint at an interior world into which the viewer is allowed to enter.
When so much art being produced today often seems to be trying too hard to be clever or simply slapped together and rushed to market, it is refreshing to see work which can stand on its own and which shows the result of years of hard work and continuing exploration.
Lozano has recently inaugurated a cultural center in Cuautemoc where presumably the next generation of artists can be trained and developed.
The show will be up through the end of the year.-David Sokolec

Murals for a new Regeneration

In all of the activity surrounding Juan Gabriel’s untimely death, it was nearly forgotten that the city  unveiled the new plaza, which is supposed to be a part of the regeneration of downtown. This is on Mariscal in what used to be either a no go or where else would you go zone depending on your tastes and vices (or lack thereof).In any case as part of this, the collectivos Local 8 and Clavera Studio were hired to paint murtals on buildings fronting the new plaza, and they make a great addition. Here are a few.-david sokolecfotor_147285713098567.jpgfotor_14728572937416.jpgfotor_147285748725210.jpgfotor_147304760546154.jpg

Fallas de Origen-Artists from Colombia

The show Fallas de Origen opens this Friday (July 15) at 7 pm in the Museo de Arte de Juarez with work by Colombian artists in a wide range of media including video, installation and murals, painting among other types.. Curated by Alejandro Luperca Morales, of Proyecto Impala fame, the show’s artists are apparently focusing on some themes which are all too familiar to everyone here in Juarez as well as in Colombia, such as narcowars, problems with housing , and of course some situations which are different such as guerrilla warfare. There was also a desire to break with the usual stereotypes which have been imposed on both places and give a more realistic portrait of  life.
Morales has had extensive experience in Colombia, having studied and shown there as well as his recent residency. So after that residency he arranged for some Colombian artists to come here to show their work.
The piece which gives the show its title (and I want to thank El Diario for this info) was created by Wilson Diaz in 1997 and currently in the collection of the Bank of the Republic of Bogota. It recreates a house  with televisions instead of windows and a garden with cocoa plants instead of the usual garden flowers. It is being recreated here but, (and I find this hysterical,) since there is a legal ban in Mexico on transporting or exhibiting cocoa plants, the “garden” will not be like the original which had 100 cocoa plants, but will have plots of earth.
Although the show itself opens at 7, there are two presentations beforehand. The co-curators TRansHistor(ia) will talk about their work at 4 pm and at 5  the artists will present their portfolios and will have a conversation about their work.
This should be a great show and we don’t get to see enough art from Latin America and especially Colombia which has a rapidly developing important contemporary art scene. So this is a wonderful opportunity to see some exciting work by some committed contemporary Colombian artists.-david sokolec

 

 

Sopa de letras o caldo de consonantes

A little while ago my friend, the well-known artist Cecilia Briones La Catrina celebrated the opening of her taller with a “sopa de letras”  during which lots of local writers read and we all oohed and ahhed over the space and the works on exhibit.
So tomorrow Friday, the 24th, she is having a second one from 1-5 at the workshop located on the 300 block of Ramon Corona, right next to Plaza Cervantino.-david sokolec

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Passion for Photography

As an antidote to the heat and to the various slings and arrows of outrageous fortune I’ve suffered recently, I’ve been taking great joy in going to the end of course arts presentations at UACJ.The ones I’ve been going to  include music, dance, painting photography etc. and  are being held mostly in either CUDA (Centro Universitario des Artes) or  Teatro Gracia Pasquel on the UACJ campus.

Last night I joined a large crowd at CUDA to see the digital photography exhibition by students of Hogla Liset Olivas. She is a truly wonderful woman who has spent a lot of time  teaching  and photographic techniques to people of all ages as well as doing her own documentation such as a series on life among the Raramuri.

Last night her students  filled two floors as well as the stairwell leading up to the second floor with their photos. Each was in a 16″x 20″ format, and  almost exclusively in color. Although there were no explanatory notes, it seemed obvious they were grouped by certain themes or assignments such as  nature, or silhouettes, or travel, and one could see how each student handled the theme. But  taken as a whole, what I sensed underlying the exhibition was an overriding sense of joy and passion. The photos were extremely well-done but,more than that, one sensed the passion and sense of both  play and commitment by the photographers.

There was no I’ve seen so much I can only be hiply ironic, or what is the market like or I’m going to appropriate someone else’s image and write a long artist’s statement explaining why it’s justified to do that. These students were learning how to use digital photography to best advantage so they can go on to use photography as a means of communication. They are doing it with a sense of purpose and dedication and more power to them.

In addition to the photography, there were student musicians who entertained with jazz throughout the evening and two tables filled with canapes and sandwiches and desserts. Really quite a wonderful evening.

So congratulations to Maestra Hogla Liset Olivas and her students. There are more exhibitions in different media this week and next and it’s always gratifying to see this side of the Juarez community and remember that this is an important part of what makes Juarez the city it is. -david sokolec