Great Art Events This Week on the Border

There are some great art events happening this week on the border. Beginning tonight, (Wednesday May 17) at the Museo de Arte here in Juarez ,Carlos Palacios, curator at the Museo de Arte Carillo Gil and curator of the Carla Rippey show currently on exhibit will give a free talk about the show. This is at 7 pm and tomorrow at noon he will lead a guided tour of this extraordinary retrospective.
There are a series of events at the museum this week in honor of International Museum Day culminating in a whole series of activities this Saturday at Un Dia en El Museo.

Friday is the opening of what promises to be a fascinating exhibtion to be shown on both sides of the border. Called “Narradores, Ponte en los Zapatos del Otro” here and more simply “Storytellers” in El Paso it shows the work of 60 students from different schools who present thier videos, and projects as well as interviews in which they talk about their life, hopes and dreams.
This was supported by the US Consulate in Juarez with the participation of some other local organizations and, of course, the assistance of a wide variety of local schools.
The opening in Juarez is this Friday night at Juarez Contemporary Gallery at Calle Omega #1351 at 7 pm. It will be up through the 21.
In El Paso it is scheduled to open on the 25th at The Station Urban Offices 500 W. Overland where it will run through the 28th.
Thursday is also the start of a series of films to be shown pimarily at Cafe Unico and at the Cineteca Nacionale branch at Cultural Centro Paso del Norte. The series is called Apanerowa and concerns indigenous culture and human rights . The  series at Cafe Unico begins at 4 pm .

So there you have some of the things going on here. Don’t tell me there’s nothing to do in Juarez.-dsokolec

 

Texas Biennial open to Mexican Artists

I just learned about the open call for the  Texas Biennial today(Thank you Kerry Doyle) so I’m calling attention to it  for artists on both sides of the border.  As is noted it’s open not only to artists living in Texas but also within ten miles of the border including Mexico. In addition the curator is Mexico City based Leslie Moody Castro. Note the $30 entry fee, but also that there is a stipend if your work is accepted. The deadline is at the end of the month so get on it. -d sokolec

Juarez blessed with arts this week

I feel like I need to clone myself this week because there are so many overlapping events I can’t see them all unless I’m my own double.
Beginning last Thursday and running through this Thursday (20) is the amazing “Ambulante-gira de Documentales.”. This yearly collection of documentary films from around the world tours various States of Mexico, and this week it is here. Mostly concerned with issues of social concerns in all of its forms it brings some remarkable films, most of which are free. Included are well-known, though too little seen films like Last Men in Aleppo, about the doctors who stayed in that city during the bombing, but there are also unknown fims and various series on different films  like a series of shorts I saw the other day about migration in all of its forms told from a child’s point of view. I was particularly moved by a film of a young boy from Syria who was missing his father still in Syria. There are director’s talks and a series of workshops. This Wednesday night there is an outdoor  screening of “Ovarian Psycho” about a group of women (Ovarian Psycho Bicycle Brigade)  who use bicycles  to take back streets of Los Angeles. This film at 8:00 will be preceded by a bicycle tour starting from La Rodadora led by Punto de Lanza and beginning at 6.
So in  addition to all of  these films, there is also the Siglo de Oro drama festival on both sides of the border which this year brings troupes from Spain, Canary Islands and Mexico City. These are all free.
Tuesday at 5 there is a free lecture about Carla Rippey’s remarkable exhibition at the Museo de Arte, and of course there are the usual goings on like the weekly c”Charla Fotografia” which features a talk on a different aspect of photography every week.

It’s a good week to be here, I just wish there were more of me.-David  sokolec

 

Exceptional African American prints at EPMA

San Antonio art collectors Harmon and Harriet Kelly have put together an extremely impressive collection of African-American art. If they had collected nothing more than the works on view at the El Paso Museum of Art, they would have still made an impressive accomplishment. These works on paper  can be viewed in any number of ways, all of them satisfying.
The exhibit ranges from the late 1800’s to 2002 and does a pretty good job of providing a cross-section of important artists during that time. Most of these artists studied at prestigious art schools in the US and abroad, and many travelled extensively . One question raised by the exhibit is why aren’t these artists better known?
The early works by artists like Grafton Tyler Brown (1841-1918) who spent most of his life in Canada  or Lois Maillou Jones (1905-1998) or Henry Ossawa Tanner(1859-1937) who studied with Thomas Eakins at the Pennsylvania Academy and then went on to spend most of his life in France generally focus on purely aesthetic concerns whether a shipwreck off the coast of Brittany or a ranch in western Canada. These are   highly skilled and well trained artists.
There is a shift a bit later with the rise of the Harlem Renaissance and with a general trend by many artists to focus on the society and social conditions around them. Although white artists like George Bellows and photographers like Walker Evans or Dorothea Lange have long been much better known, the skill and perception of an artist like Aaron Douglas (1899-1979) known as the Dean of the Harlem Renaissance among others makes us want to see more.
Although Europe was often a favorite place for these artists to live and study, a few also went to Mexico. Elizabeth Catlett (1915-2012) and Hale Aspacio Woodruff  (1900-1980) were among those who found inspiration in that country. Woodruff in fact  worked with Diego Rivera on murals.
The newer pieces in the show are generally far more overtly political, some using humor others straight-forward.
The Kelleys apparently started collecting this art when they saw a show and were somewhat embarrassed they were not very familiar with many of the artists. Their gain is also our gain in this excellent exhibition which can be seen purely from the point  of view of aesthetics as there are a wide variety of printing techniques employed and a wide variety of artistic skill at play, or  it can be seen as a socially relevant show documenting African -American life and concerns over a century or it can be seen as at long last bringing to view some extremely talented artists who are not nearly as well known as they should be at least to much of the general public. This show helps to rectify that situation.
It is free and on view until April 16.-david sokolec

 

 

 

 

Francis Alys showing in Juarez

Belgian born artist Francis Alys is arguably one of the best known international  artists currently living in Mexico.He has worked all over the world and been shown in important venues all over the world. Currently he is represented by the influential David Zwirner gallery.

I bring this up because beginning tomorrow (Oct 17) his work will be on view at Alejandro Luperca Morales’s visual movable feast Proyecto Impala. Alys was in Juarez a few years ago on a project literally kicking a fireball down the street. This is typical of his work which involves interacting in various ways with the environment, in ways which usually include a political component or to simply provide a different way of interacting or viewing a given space. He will either work alone or involve members of the community in his activity. Because of this the work seems to fall more properly under the heading of documentation rather than a traditional finished work of art, but as good art can generally be said to change our perception of something, to look at things in a new way, Alys certainly does that following his own path. He apparently likes to invoke the idea of the flaneur (traditionally a stroller of boulevards, a walker so his work often involves strolling through a city or some area . (I can relate to this as being a flaneur is perhaps the only occupation I have asiduously and seriusly pursued over the years.)

It is really exciting to have his work here, and I believe it was due to his connection with local artist and arts promoter Morales (who seems to know a staggering array of people all over the place) that this happened so thank you Alejandro and everyone else involved  for helping make this happen. Mo info on Alys can be found on his website (including that fireball in Juarez), and for when and where the Proyecto Impala will be you can go to their website or Facebook. -david sokolec

 

Chalk the Block Rides Again

A reminder that this weekend is Chalk the Block weekend, and this year features an enormous dragon and the perfect selfie lighting. It’s been great to watch this fair grow and change and become really one of the major family events  in El Paso
The dragon, an enormous multi-ton light breathing monster using a dump truck as a base, is the brain child of Hong Kong artist Teddy Lo and Detroit artist Ryan Doyle. The selfie wall is a modular wall featuring the prospect of a wide variety of lighting situations so you can take the perfect view of yourself. I might be the only person who doesn’t  quite get the point of selfies other than as a possible hedge against dementia. They vaguely remind me of kidnap situations where you are asked to hold up the day’s paper to prove you’re alive, but everyone else seems to love them and this should be quite wonderful.
Among other art events here is also going to be a mural wall anchored by the El Paso Museum of Art and the Convention center. Artists are well-known and seemingly ubiquitous local street artists like Jellyfish collective and Los Dos as well as artists from Albuquerque and elsewhere.
And of course there will be lots of chalk drawings.
In any case the weather promises to be nice and it should be, as always, a lot of fun-david sokolec

Cinema magic

Here in Juarez there is an even greater than usual opportunity these days to see  interesting and varied films from all over the world. There is the 20thTour de Cine Francaise sponsored by Alliance Francaise, among other organizations, which features one film every day through the 13th at Misiones Mall.. This is perhaps the most commercial of the film series on offer, but commercial does not mean some blockbuster adventure film, but some of the better or more interesting films recently produced in that country. Incidentally, Alliance Francaise also shows French films every two weeks at its headquarters here and recently wrapped up a six day showing of some amazing shorts from all over Europe.hese
Over at the MUREF (Museo de la Revolucion en la Frontera) they are showing a series of internationally made documentaries promoted by Documental Ambulante Asociacion Civil, a national organization founded in 2005 devoted to promoting documentary films. These are shown Friday at 4 and Saturday at noon, and the series runs through the end of the month.
Cafe Unico, which always shows different cycles of films on Thursday, is this month featuring German films selected by cineclub kino Juarez.
While admission at Cinepolis is the usual admission price to the theater, the rest of the films are free.
So while I was watching an ad for the Morelia film festival I couldn’t help wonder why doesn’t Chihuahua have an international film festival and I don’t mean the local binational film festival but a really large statewide affair. There are any number of local filmmakers, and if the push in El Paso for more state funding for filmmaking is successful, you might have a really interesting situation. Morelia, Oaxaca and other states seem to have big international film festivals, so how come not here?  David sokolec