Children of the Rarimuri

There is a sweet photo exhibition which opened a few days ago at the Museo de Arqueologia here in Juarez that might be something of a needed antidote to the fear-fueled hate which arrived across the border recently.For some 12 years the ever active and seemingly tireless multi-tasking photographer Ogla (no, that’s not a typo) Liset Olivas has been photographing Rarimuri life in the Sierra Tarahumara and, through those photos, to bring us a closer understanding of what life is like in that rugged mountain range. In this show entitled La Raíz de Tu Mirada, she focused exclusively on Rarimuri children and women and their daily lives. By turns thoughtful or wistful or just grinning with delight the people in these photos reflect dignity and humanity.At a time when there are so many on the other side of the border who seem to feel frightened of anyone who seems different, this show helps remind us of our common humanity, and portrays a beautiful, strong and resilient group of people. It will be up until Sept 8.I also have to say that for anyone (like me) who has not been to the Museum in awhile and who remembers it as a small cramped area, it is it has been transformed into something totally different and wonderful with huge airy spaces and lots of room for exhibitions. – David sokolec

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Mago la Magnifica

Margarita Gandara Armendáriz (Mago) who died last year at the age of 89, has been given a well deserved retrospective at the Museo de Arte de Ciudad Juárez. A true fronteriza she was born in El Paso, but, interestingly, her grandfather registered her as a Mexican citizen. She was always interested in art, studied it formally and then after 25 years of marriage , divorced and constructed a private art studio in Juarez which she called Casa Cui and spent years there happily living and working alone until the violence in 2011 forced her out.

She was strongly influenced by Italian Renaissance al Fresco artists as well as by Byzantine mosaicists. From that beginning, she incorporated a wide variety of, at the time, untraditional material such as fiberglass, wood and incorporated techniques learned from bricklayers to focus on visually exploring her surroundings, but also the underlying cultural spirit in the form of prehispanic and Christian religious symbols which always lie just beneath the suface here .

La Maquina de la Esperanza

La Niña cósmica

Although she worked in many different media, it is unquestionably her large murals and her sculptures which are the most impressive and are here shown along with an installation representing her beloved studio Casa Cui.

Fortunately Casa Cui has now been turned into an art center which will not only keep alive the memory of this wonderful artist but also her desire for that space to be an oasis for artists.

Installation reproducing Casa Cui

The show continues until September 7. – David sokolec

Clothes Keeping Tradition

Doña Maria Esther Zuno de Echeverria (1924-1999) was so concerned about the increasing custom in the 1970s of Mexicans to forego, and therefore to possibly forget traditional clothing, that she commissioned artisans to clothe dolls wearing traditional clothing from all the regions of Mexico. These artists created clothes worn for special occasions such as ceremonial dances as well as the clothes traditionally worn for every day.

The Museum of the Revolution (MUREF) here in Juarez has just opened a display of these dolls in a show called Vestidos de Tradición Por Amor à México.

Filling the main floor of the museum the glass cases show the wide diversity of clothing worn with an explanation of when the clothes were worn, and the and how the clothes for the individual maniquíns were made whether by hand or by machine.

Fascinating display which runs through September 22. – david Sokolec

Haunting images of a troubled land.

For the last number of years when people think of Tamaulipas, if they think of it at all, it is probably only as a place of violence. However much like Juárez, which often suffers much the same sort of reputation, there is more to the area than the horrible things people do to each other.

Local artist Jair Tapia was awarded a three months arts residency there and has produced a haunting work entitled “Espacios en Vigilia” which was shown last weekend at the Museo de Arte de Ciudad Juárez.

This was Tapia’s first visit to Tamaulipas and his work is something of a visual tone poem reflecting his impressions of Victoria and the surrounding area. Four projectors present a simultaneous stream of images. This is not a straight forward portrait in the usual sense. In fact, there seems to be little or nothing which even tells us where we are. There are no people or well-known landmarks to indicate geographical specificity. This is the polar opposite of those old travel shows of the This is Tamaulipas! variety. Instead the mostly pastoral scenes create an impression of a mostly beautiful area, but the background music as well as the images themselves which, though often beautiful, nevertheless give a sense something is off, that there is something definitely seriously amiss. There is a sense, if not specifically of danger, then of foreboding running through the series.

I found that long after I left the museum the images, or more specifically, the mood of disquiet evoked stayed with me, and actually continued to grow stronger throughout the rest of the evening.

Through this series of seemingly random images located somewhat out of time and place, Tapia has been able to evoke the sense of both beauty and danger he felt while living there, and has enabled us to feel something of the same.

Unfortunately, for technical reasons, this will only be shown once more this upcoming weekend, but hopefully he will be able to find a way to get the necessary equipment and venues to show it in other places. It is a beautiful and haunting work and deserves a larger audience.-David Sokolec.